• beachgnome:

    metanoianmayhem:

    vanspoor:

    This isn’t even DCU, which is known to be dark, folks.

    This is the kids’ cartoon version of Batman.

    Addressing abusive relationships in a kids’ cartoon.

    They tried to get the message across at a young age to Batman fans. I wonder if it sank in at all.

    though I’d like to pick at addressing it as calling her a doormat because abusive relationships are more complicated then that. but, yes. good.

    Writing Harley Quinn 101: She was created to address a serious issue. Respect that.

    (via theoriginalantichrist)

  • realistixc:

    wreckedly:

    theinfamouschubbykitten:

    MOTHERFUCKING BEAUTIFUL

    THIS

    I FINALLY FOUND THIS AGAIN

    (via jonswagart)

  • policymic:

    Gender-bent Disney princes make meaningful point about the fluidity of gender

    To combat the strict stereotypes that Disney princes and princesses represent, some geniuses at Imgur have started swapping the genders of Disney characters. Genderbent Disney shows that Disney clearly gets a little lazy when it comes to reusing their character molds, making it surprisingly easy to look more feminine. To make a male character look more classically feminine, for example, all you need to do is round the chin, soften the jaw and make the nose a little slimmer.

    But with the simplicity of these alterations — a few millimeters of nose, a different hairstyle — Disney accidentally makes a meaningful point about the fluidity of gender expression.

    Read moreFollow policymic

    (via sadynax)

  • Maybe there’s something you’re afraid to say, or someone you’re afraid to love, or somewhere you’re afraid to go. It’s gonna hurt. It’s gonna hurt because it matters.

    John Green (via psych-facts)

    (via theoriginalantichrist)

  • theonlyroseleft:

    saucefactory:

    crutchy:

    Thanks, Cas. Thanks.

    TRUE THOUGH

    STILL MY FAVORITE CAS/SAM/DEAN COMIC EVER

    Caaaaaassssss

    (via uhhgayyyy)

  • sandandglass:

    Jason Jones talks to a Russian woman protesting against Russia’s anti-gay laws.

    (via thesleepingflamingo)

  • emojinalart:

The Oscar Selfie - Ellen Degeneres

  • rosalarian:

    Feminism is having a wardrobe malfunction.

    Does your brand of feminism remove barriers for women, or simply move them around? Does is expand options for women, or does it just shift them? You don’t liberate women by forcing them to choose option B instead of option A. What is comfortable for you might not be comfortable for someone else, and it’s entirely possible that what you see as oppressive, other women find comfortable or even downright liberating.

    Before you think the girl in the middle is a strawman, let me tell you I used to be her, back in my misguided youth. I considered myself the standard to which other people should adhere. But that was stupid. It’s not up to me to tell people how to dress, and it’s much nicer to let everyone choose for themselves.

    Some women would feel naked without a veil. Some women would find it restrictive. Some women would feel restricted by a bra. Some women would feel naked without one. Some women would feel restricted by a tight corset. Others love them. Some wear lots of clothes with a corset. Some only wear the corset and nothing else. What makes any article of clothing oppressive is someone forcing you to wear it. And it’s just as oppressive to force someone not to wear something that they want to wear.

    (via itsmylife87)

  • themanwithfrozenhearts:

    im a really affectionate person once you get past my 5 layers of shyness, awkwardness, fear, vague dislike, and loneliness

    (via theheirsofdurin)

  • I know I’ve told this story before, but my abusive ex refused to let me take birth control. I was on the pill until he found them in my purse.

    I went to the Student Health Center—they were completely unhelpful, choosing to lecture me about the importance of safe sex (recommending condoms) instead of actually listening to my problem.

    Then I went to Planned Parenthood. The Nurse Practitioner took one look at my fading bruises and stopped the exam. She called in the doctor. The doctor came in and simply asked me: “Are you ready to leave him?” When I denied that I was being abused, she didn’t argue with me. She just asked me what I needed. I said I need a birth control method that my boyfriend couldn’t detect. She recommended a few options and we decided on Depo.

    When I told her that my boyfriend read my emails and listened to my phone messages and was known to follow me, she suggested to do the Depo injections at off hours when the clinic was normally closed. She made a note in my chart and instructed the front desk never to leave messages for me—instead, she programmed her personal cell phone number into my phone under the name “Nora”. She told me she would call me to schedule my appointments; she wouldn’t leave a message, but I should call her back when I was able to.

    And that was it. No judgment. No lecture. She walked me to the door and told me to call her day or night if I needed anything. That she lived 5 blocks from campus and would come get me. That I wasn’t alone. That she just wanted me to be safe.

    I never called her to come to my rescue. But I have no doubt that she would have come if I had called. She kept me on Depo for a year, giving me those monthly injections in secret, helping me prevent a desperately unwanted pregnancy.

    I cannot thank Planned Parenthood enough for the work they do.

Page 1 of 142